The Connection Between Forex and Gold Plus500 New Zealand

No, the British did not steal $45 trillion from India

This is an updated copy of the version on BadHistory. I plan to update it in accordance with the feedback I got.
I'd like to thank two people who will remain anonymous for helping me greatly with this post (you know who you are)
Three years ago a festschrift for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri was published by Shubhra Chakrabarti, a history teacher at the University of Delhi and Utsa Patnaik, a Marxist economist who taught at JNU until 2010.
One of the essays in the festschirt by Utsa Patnaik was an attempt to quantify the "drain" undergone by India during British Rule. Her conclusion? Britain robbed India of $45 trillion (or £9.2 trillion) during their 200 or so years of rule. This figure was immensely popular, and got republished in several major news outlets (here, here, here, here (they get the number wrong) and more recently here), got a mention from the Minister of External Affairs & returns 29,100 results on Google. There's also plenty of references to it here on Reddit.
Patnaik is not the first to calculate such a figure. Angus Maddison thought it was £100 million, Simon Digby said £1 billion, Javier Estaban said £40 million see Roy (2019). The huge range of figures should set off some alarm bells.
So how did Patnaik calculate this (shockingly large) figure? Well, even though I don't have access to the festschrift, she conveniently has written an article detailing her methodology here. Let's have a look.
How exactly did the British manage to diddle us and drain our wealth’ ? was the question that Basudev Chatterjee (later editor of a volume in the Towards Freedom project) had posed to me 50 years ago when we were fellow-students abroad.
This is begging the question.
After decades of research I find that using India’s commodity export surplus as the measure and applying an interest rate of 5%, the total drain from 1765 to 1938, compounded up to 2016, comes to £9.2 trillion; since $4.86 exchanged for £1 those days, this sum equals about $45 trillion.
This is completely meaningless. To understand why it's meaningless consider India's annual coconut exports. These are almost certainly a surplus but the surplus in trade is countered by the other country buying the product (indeed, by definition, trade surpluses contribute to the GDP of a nation which hardly plays into intuitive conceptualisations of drain).
Furthermore, Dewey (2019) critiques the 5% interest rate.
She [Patnaik] consistently adopts statistical assumptions (such as compound interest at a rate of 5% per annum over centuries) that exaggerate the magnitude of the drain
Moving on:
The exact mechanism of drain, or transfers from India to Britain was quite simple.
Convenient.
Drain theory possessed the political merit of being easily grasped by a nation of peasants. [...] No other idea could arouse people than the thought that they were being taxed so that others in far off lands might live in comfort. [...] It was, therefore, inevitable that the drain theory became the main staple of nationalist political agitation during the Gandhian era.
- Chandra et al. (1989)
The key factor was Britain’s control over our taxation revenues combined with control over India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its booming commodity export surplus with the world. Simply put, Britain used locally raised rupee tax revenues to pay for its net import of goods, a highly abnormal use of budgetary funds not seen in any sovereign country.
The issue with figures like these is they all make certain methodological assumptions that are impossible to prove. From Roy in Frankema et al. (2019):
the "drain theory" of Indian poverty cannot be tested with evidence, for several reasons. First, it rests on the counterfactual that any money saved on account of factor payments abroad would translate into domestic investment, which can never be proved. Second, it rests on "the primitive notion that all payments to foreigners are "drain"", that is, on the assumption that these payments did not contribute to domestic national income to the equivalent extent (Kumar 1985, 384; see also Chaudhuri 1968). Again, this cannot be tested. [...] Fourth, while British officers serving India did receive salaries that were many times that of the average income in India, a paper using cross-country data shows that colonies with better paid officers were governed better (Jones 2013).
Indeed, drain theory rests on some very weak foundations. This, in of itself, should be enough to dismiss any of the other figures that get thrown out. Nonetheless, I felt it would be a useful exercise to continue exploring Patnaik's take on drain theory.
The East India Company from 1765 onwards allocated every year up to one-third of Indian budgetary revenues net of collection costs, to buy a large volume of goods for direct import into Britain, far in excess of that country’s own needs.
So what's going on here? Well Roy (2019) explains it better:
Colonial India ran an export surplus, which, together with foreign investment, was used to pay for services purchased from Britain. These payments included interest on public debt, salaries, and pensions paid to government offcers who had come from Britain, salaries of managers and engineers, guaranteed profts paid to railway companies, and repatriated business profts. How do we know that any of these payments involved paying too much? The answer is we do not.
So what was really happening is the government was paying its workers for services (as well as guaranteeing profits - to promote investment - something the GoI does today Dalal (2019), and promoting business in India), and those workers were remitting some of that money to Britain. This is hardly a drain (unless, of course, Indian diaspora around the world today are "draining" it). In some cases, the remittances would take the form of goods (as described) see Chaudhuri (1983):
It is obvious that these debit items were financed through the export surplus on merchandise account, and later, when railway construction started on a large scale in India, through capital import. Until 1833 the East India Company followed a cumbersome method in remitting the annual home charges. This was to purchase export commodities in India out of revenue, which were then shipped to London and the proceeds from their sale handed over to the home treasury.
While Roy's earlier point argues better paid officers governed better, it is honestly impossible to say what part of the repatriated export surplus was a drain, and what was not. However calling all of it a drain is definitely misguided.
It's worth noting that Patnaik seems to make no attempt to quantify the benefits of the Raj either, Dewey (2019)'s 2nd criticism:
she [Patnaik] consistently ignores research that would tend to cut the economic impact of the drain down to size, such as the work on the sources of investment during the industrial revolution (which shows that industrialisation was financed by the ploughed-back profits of industrialists) or the costs of empire school (which stresses the high price of imperial defence)

Since tropical goods were highly prized in other cold temperate countries which could never produce them, in effect these free goods represented international purchasing power for Britain which kept a part for its own use and re-exported the balance to other countries in Europe and North America against import of food grains, iron and other goods in which it was deficient.
Re-exports necessarily adds value to goods when the goods are processed and when the goods are transported. The country with the largest navy at the time would presumably be in very good stead to do the latter.
The British historians Phyllis Deane and WA Cole presented an incorrect estimate of Britain’s 18th-19th century trade volume, by leaving out re-exports completely. I found that by 1800 Britain’s total trade was 62% higher than their estimate, on applying the correct definition of trade including re-exports, that is used by the United Nations and by all other international organisations.
While interesting, and certainly expected for such an old book, re-exporting necessarily adds value to goods.
When the Crown took over from the Company, from 1861 a clever system was developed under which all of India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its fast-rising commodity export surplus with the world, was intercepted and appropriated by Britain. As before up to a third of India’s rising budgetary revenues was not spent domestically but was set aside as ‘expenditure abroad’.
So, what does this mean? Britain appropriated all of India's earnings, and then spent a third of it aboard? Not exactly. She is describing home charges see Roy (2019) again:
Some of the expenditures on defense and administration were made in sterling and went out of the country. This payment by the government was known as the Home Charges. For example, interest payment on loans raised to finance construction of railways and irrigation works, pensions paid to retired officers, and purchase of stores, were payments in sterling. [...] almost all money that the government paid abroad corresponded to the purchase of a service from abroad. [...] The balance of payments system that emerged after 1800 was based on standard business principles. India bought something and paid for it. State revenues were used to pay for wages of people hired abroad, pay for interest on loans raised abroad, and repatriation of profits on foreign investments coming into India. These were legitimate market transactions.
Indeed, if paying for what you buy is drain, then several billions of us are drained every day.
The Secretary of State for India in Council, based in London, invited foreign importers to deposit with him the payment (in gold, sterling and their own currencies) for their net imports from India, and these gold and forex payments disappeared into the yawning maw of the SoS’s account in the Bank of England.
It should be noted that India having two heads was beneficial, and encouraged investment per Roy (2019):
The fact that the India Office in London managed a part of the monetary system made India creditworthy, stabilized its currency, and encouraged foreign savers to put money into railways and private enterprise in India. Current research on the history of public debt shows that stable and large colonies found it easier to borrow abroad than independent economies because the investors trusted the guarantee of the colonist powers.

Against India’s net foreign earnings he issued bills, termed Council bills (CBs), to an equivalent rupee value. The rate (between gold-linked sterling and silver rupee) at which the bills were issued, was carefully adjusted to the last farthing, so that foreigners would never find it more profitable to ship financial gold as payment directly to Indians, compared to using the CB route. Foreign importers then sent the CBs by post or by telegraph to the export houses in India, that via the exchange banks were paid out of the budgeted provision of sums under ‘expenditure abroad’, and the exporters in turn paid the producers (peasants and artisans) from whom they sourced the goods.
Sunderland (2013) argues CBs had two main roles (and neither were part of a grand plot to keep gold out of India):
Council bills had two roles. They firstly promoted trade by handing the IO some control of the rate of exchange and allowing the exchange banks to remit funds to India and to hedge currency transaction risks. They also enabled the Indian government to transfer cash to England for the payment of its UK commitments.

The United Nations (1962) historical data for 1900 to 1960, show that for three decades up to 1928 (and very likely earlier too) India posted the second highest merchandise export surplus in the world, with USA in the first position. Not only were Indians deprived of every bit of the enormous international purchasing power they had earned over 175 years, even its rupee equivalent was not issued to them since not even the colonial government was credited with any part of India’s net gold and forex earnings against which it could issue rupees. The sleight-of-hand employed, namely ‘paying’ producers out of their own taxes, made India’s export surplus unrequited and constituted a tax-financed drain to the metropolis, as had been correctly pointed out by those highly insightful classical writers, Dadabhai Naoroji and RCDutt.
It doesn't appear that others appreciate their insight Roy (2019):
K. N. Chaudhuri rightly calls such practice ‘confused’ economics ‘coloured by political feelings’.

Surplus budgets to effect such heavy tax-financed transfers had a severe employment–reducing and income-deflating effect: mass consumption was squeezed in order to release export goods. Per capita annual foodgrains absorption in British India declined from 210 kg. during the period 1904-09, to 157 kg. during 1937-41, and to only 137 kg by 1946.
Dewey (1978) points out reliability issues with Indian agriculutural statistics, however this calorie decline persists to this day. Some of it is attributed to less food being consumed at home Smith (2015), a lower infectious disease burden Duh & Spears (2016) and diversified diets Vankatesh et al. (2016).
If even a part of its enormous foreign earnings had been credited to it and not entirely siphoned off, India could have imported modern technology to build up an industrial structure as Japan was doing.
This is, unfortunately, impossible to prove. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication that India would've united (this is arguably more plausible than the given counterfactual1). Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been nuked in WW2, much like Japan. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been invaded by lizard people, much like Japan. The list continues eternally.
Nevertheless, I will charitably examine the given counterfactual anyway. Did pre-colonial India have industrial potential? The answer is a resounding no.
From Gupta (1980):
This article starts from the premise that while economic categories - the extent of commodity production, wage labour, monetarisation of the economy, etc - should be the basis for any analysis of the production relations of pre-British India, it is the nature of class struggles arising out of particular class alignments that finally gives the decisive twist to social change. Arguing on this premise, and analysing the available evidence, this article concludes that there was little potential for industrial revolution before the British arrived in India because, whatever might have been the character of economic categories of that period, the class relations had not sufficiently matured to develop productive forces and the required class struggle for a 'revolution' to take place.
A view echoed in Raychaudhuri (1983):
Yet all of this did not amount to an economic situation comparable to that of western Europe on the eve of the industrial revolution. Her technology - in agriculture as well as manufacturers - had by and large been stagnant for centuries. [...] The weakness of the Indian economy in the mid-eighteenth century, as compared to pre-industrial Europe was not simply a matter of technology and commercial and industrial organization. No scientific or geographical revolution formed part of the eighteenth-century Indian's historical experience. [...] Spontaneous movement towards industrialisation is unlikely in such a situation.
So now we've established India did not have industrial potential, was India similar to Japan just before the Meiji era? The answer, yet again, unsurprisingly, is no. Japan's economic situation was not comparable to India's, which allowed for Japan to finance its revolution. From Yasuba (1986):
All in all, the Japanese standard of living may not have been much below the English standard of living before industrialization, and both of them may have been considerably higher than the Indian standard of living. We can no longer say that Japan started from a pathetically low economic level and achieved a rapid or even "miraculous" economic growth. Japan's per capita income was almost as high as in Western Europe before industrialization, and it was possible for Japan to produce surplus in the Meiji Period to finance private and public capital formation.
The circumstances that led to Meiji Japan were extremely unique. See Tomlinson (1985):
Most modern comparisons between India and Japan, written by either Indianists or Japanese specialists, stress instead that industrial growth in Meiji Japan was the product of unique features that were not reproducible elsewhere. [...] it is undoubtably true that Japan's progress to industrialization has been unique and unrepeatable
So there you have it. Unsubstantiated statistical assumptions, calling any number you can a drain & assuming a counterfactual for no good reason gets you this $45 trillion number. Hopefully that's enough to bury it in the ground.
1. Several authors have affirmed that Indian identity is a colonial artefact. For example see Rajan 1969:
Perhaps the single greatest and most enduring impact of British rule over India is that it created an Indian nation, in the modern political sense. After centuries of rule by different dynasties overparts of the Indian sub-continent, and after about 100 years of British rule, Indians ceased to be merely Bengalis, Maharashtrians,or Tamils, linguistically and culturally.
or see Bryant 2000:
But then, it would be anachronistic to condemn eighteenth-century Indians, who served the British, as collaborators, when the notion of 'democratic' nationalism or of an Indian 'nation' did not then exist. [...] Indians who fought for them, differed from the Europeans in having a primary attachment to a non-belligerent religion, family and local chief, which was stronger than any identity they might have with a more remote prince or 'nation'.

Bibliography

Chakrabarti, Shubra & Patnaik, Utsa (2018). Agrarian and other histories: Essays for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri. Colombia University Press
Hickel, Jason (2018). How the British stole $45 trillion from India. The Guardian
Bhuyan, Aroonim & Sharma, Krishan (2019). The Great Loot: How the British stole $45 trillion from India. Indiapost
Monbiot, George (2020). English Landowners have stolen our rights. It is time to reclaim them. The Guardian
Tsjeng, Zing (2020). How Britain Stole $45 trillion from India with trains | Empires of Dirt. Vice
Chaudhury, Dipanjan (2019). British looted $45 trillion from India in today’s value: Jaishankar. The Economic Times
Roy, Tirthankar (2019). How British rule changed India's economy: The Paradox of the Raj. Palgrave Macmillan
Patnaik, Utsa (2018). How the British impoverished India. Hindustan Times
Tuovila, Alicia (2019). Expenditure method. Investopedia
Dewey, Clive (2019). Changing the guard: The dissolution of the nationalist–Marxist orthodoxy in the agrarian and agricultural history of India. The Indian Economic & Social History Review
Chandra, Bipan et al. (1989). India's Struggle for Independence, 1857-1947. Penguin Books
Frankema, Ewout & Booth, Anne (2019). Fiscal Capacity and the Colonial State in Asia and Africa, c. 1850-1960. Cambridge University Press
Dalal, Sucheta (2019). IL&FS Controversy: Centre is Paying Up on Sovereign Guarantees to ADB, KfW for Group's Loan. TheWire
Chaudhuri, K.N. (1983). X - Foreign Trade and Balance of Payments (1757–1947). Cambridge University Press
Sunderland, David (2013). Financing the Raj: The City of London and Colonial India, 1858-1940. Boydell Press
Dewey, Clive (1978). Patwari and Chaukidar: Subordinate officials and the reliability of India’s agricultural statistics. Athlone Press
Smith, Lisa (2015). The great Indian calorie debate: Explaining rising undernourishment during India’s rapid economic growth. Food Policy
Duh, Josephine & Spears, Dean (2016). Health and Hunger: Disease, Energy Needs, and the Indian Calorie Consumption Puzzle. The Economic Journal
Vankatesh, P. et al. (2016). Relationship between Food Production and Consumption Diversity in India – Empirical Evidences from Cross Section Analysis. Agricultural Economics Research Review
Gupta, Shaibal (1980). Potential of Industrial Revolution in Pre-British India. Economic and Political Weekly
Raychaudhuri, Tapan (1983). I - The mid-eighteenth-century background. Cambridge University Press
Yasuba, Yasukichi (1986). Standard of Living in Japan Before Industrialization: From what Level did Japan Begin? A Comment. The Journal of Economic History
Tomblinson, B.R. (1985). Writing History Sideways: Lessons for Indian Economic Historians from Meiji Japan. Cambridge University Press
Rajan, M.S. (1969). The Impact of British Rule in India. Journal of Contemporary History
Bryant, G.J. (2000). Indigenous Mercenaries in the Service of European Imperialists: The Case of the Sepoys in the Early British Indian Army, 1750-1800. War in History
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Giving Audiobook Gifts from my large library! Pick one and I'll send it to your Audible Library :D

Hi everyone, I have a bunch of awesome audio-books and I learned that Audible lets you gift 1 book to every Audible account. I haven't done this before so everyone will be able to get a book!

Below is my list of books, I have the Sherlock collection which is over 60 hours, The Silent Patient, Bird Box, some great Sci-fi books and much much more!
Send me a message to bradkingbooks at g.mail with the book you'd like and the e.mail associated with your Audible Account that you'd like it sent to and I'll send it over asap!

I'm sure I'll get a lot of requests so I'll have to batch process these, don't panic if I don't get the book to you right away, I will :)

List of Audiobooks

The Things We Cannot Say
Kelly Rimmer

The Dark Bones
Loreth Anne White

A Killer's Mind: Zoe Bentley Mystery
Mike Omer

Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man's Fundamentals for Delicious Living
Nick Offerman

Dad Is Fat
Jim Gaffigan

Sentiment Inc.: The Retro Sci-Fi Series, Book 2
Poul Anderson

Shadows of Tomorrow
Jessica Meats

Thinking Big: Think Differently, Grow Rich, Develop Better Personal Relationships, Move Up the Corporate Ladder, Sleep Better and Fight Mediocrity: Everything You Need to Become a Stable, Succesful Human: Superior Ultralearning Topics, Book One
Paxton Arbital

What to Expect When You’re Expecting
Heidi Murkoff

So, You Want to Talk About Government Contracting?: Everything You Need to Know in Order to Become a Government Contracting Master - 3 Guides in 1!
Brad W. King

Then She Was Gone: A Novel
Lisa Jewell

The Silent Patient
Alex Michaelides

Bird Box: A Novel
Josh Malerman

The Silver Horn Echoes: A Song of Roland
Michael Eging,
Steve Arnold

The Burnout Generation
Anne Helen Petersen

One Good Deed
David Baldacci

DragonMan: The 13th Sign: DragonMan Series, Book 8
Ted Lazaris


Visions: Knights of Salucia, Book 1
C.D. Espeseth

The Black Hussars
Mitchell Lüthi

Swing Trading: How to Become a Swing Trader. Complete Guide to Learning Strategies, Techniques, Tools & What You Need to Know About: Options, Stocks, Forex & Cryptocurrency
Ted Brown

Starblind: Starblind, Book 1
D. T. Dyllin

Akillia's Reign: Puatera Online Series, Book 4
Dawn Chapman

Confessions of a Shanty Irishman
Michael Corrigan

True Crime Stories Boxset: 48 Terrifying True Crime Murder Cases: List of Twelve Collection, Book 1
Ryan Becker

The Sisters
Dervla McTiernan

Body of Proof: An Audible Original
Darrell Brown,
Sophie Ellis

Understudies
Ravi Mangla

Academic Curveball: Braxton Campus Mysteries, Book 1
James J. Cudney

Dead on Instinct: A Dr. Jessica Coran, FBI, Medical Thriller: The Instinct Series, Book 15
Robert W. Walker

Captain
Thomas Block

To My Beloved Heart: The Last Journey of Edgar Allan Poe
James Marchiori

The Cabinet of Curiosities: A Novel
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

Wally Roux, Quantum Mechanic
Nick Carr

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama
Robert Louis Stevenson,
Marty Ross - adaptation

Reliquary: Pendergast, Book 2
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

Relic
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

The Life We Bury
Allen Eskens

We Are Legion (We Are Bob): Bobiverse, Book 1
Dennis E. Taylor

The Wife Between Us
Greer Hendricks,
Sarah Pekkanen

The Deep, Deep Snow
Brian Freeman

The Evil of Father: Father Earth, Book 2
Brad W. King

Backlash: The Scot Harvath Series, Book 19
Brad Thor

Leviathan Wakes
James S. A. Corey

Ender's Game Alive: The Full Cast Audioplay
Orson Scott Card

Chainworld
Matt Langley,
Paul Ebbs

The Dead Drink First
Dale Maharidge

Alien III: An Audible Original Drama
William Gibson

The Silver City: A Prequel of the Father Earth Series
Brad W. King

The Echo Killing: A Mystery
Christi Daugherty

Sherlock Holmes
Arthur Conan Doyle,
Stephen Fry - introductions

Evil Has a Name: The Untold of the Golden State Killer Investigation
Paul Holes,
Jim Clemente,
Peter McDonnell

Infernal Devices: Mortal Engines, Book 3
Philip Reeve

A Darkling Plain: Mortal Engines, Book 4
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The Expectant Father: The Ultimate Guide for Dads-to-Be
Armin A. Brott,
Jennifer Ash

Yeah Baby!: The Modern Mama's Guide to Mastering Pregnancy, Having a Healthy Baby, and Bouncing Back Better Than Ever
Jillian Michaels

Situation Momedy
Jenna Von Oy

Whoa, Baby! What Just Happened?
Kelly Rowland

Predator's Gold: Mortal Engines, Book 2
Philip Reeve

Where the Crawdads Sing
Delia Owens

Sharp Objects: A Novel
Gillian Flynn

Congo
Michael Crichton

Something in the Water: A Novel
Catherine Steadman

Mortal Engines: Mortal Engines, Book 1
Philip Reeve

The Last Mrs. Parrish: A Novel
Liv Constantine

Sometimes I Lie
Alice Feeney

Silent Child: Audible's Thriller of 2017
Sarah A. Denzil

Paradox Bound: A Novel
Peter Clines

Armada
Armada: A Novel

Ernest Cline
Ready Player One

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The Alice Network


The Alice Network: A Novel
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Killman Creek
Rachel Caine

The Woman in the Window: A Novel
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Murder on Black Swan Lane
Andrea Penrose

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The Midnight Line: A Jack Reacher Novel
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Cold Moon: The Huntress/FBI Thrillers, Book 3
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Blood Moon
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The Good Daughter: A Novel
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Never Go Back: A Jack Reacher Novel
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My Sister's Grave: Tracy Crosswhite, Book 1
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[FREE] 1 Audio-book Gift from my large library!

I have a bunch of awesome audio-books and I learned that Audible lets you gift 1 book to every Audible account so anyone can pick any book any number of times, so choose your favorite. I haven't done this before so everyone will be able to get a book!
Below is my list of books, I have the Sherlock collection which is over 60 hours, The Silent Patient, Bird Box, some great Sci-fi books and much much more! Send me a message with the book you'd like and the emal associated with your Audible Account that you'd like it sent to.
I'm sure I'll get a lot of requests so I'll have to batch process these, don't panic if I don't get the book to you right away, I will :)

List of Audiobooks

The Things We Cannot Say
Kelly Rimmer

The Dark Bones
Loreth Anne White

A Killer's Mind: Zoe Bentley Mystery
Mike Omer

Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man's Fundamentals for Delicious Living
Nick Offerman

Dad Is Fat
Jim Gaffigan

Sentiment Inc.: The Retro Sci-Fi Series, Book 2
Poul Anderson

Shadows of Tomorrow
Jessica Meats

Thinking Big: Think Differently, Grow Rich, Develop Better Personal Relationships, Move Up the Corporate Ladder, Sleep Better and Fight Mediocrity: Everything You Need to Become a Stable, Succesful Human: Superior Ultralearning Topics, Book One
Paxton Arbital

What to Expect When You’re Expecting
Heidi Murkoff

So, You Want to Talk About Government Contracting?: Everything You Need to Know in Order to Become a Government Contracting Master - 3 Guides in 1!
Brad W. King

Then She Was Gone: A Novel
Lisa Jewell

The Silent Patient
Alex Michaelides

Bird Box: A Novel
Josh Malerman

The Silver Horn Echoes: A Song of Roland
Michael Eging,
Steve Arnold

The Burnout Generation
Anne Helen Petersen

One Good Deed
David Baldacci

DragonMan: The 13th Sign: DragonMan Series, Book 8
Ted Lazaris


Visions: Knights of Salucia, Book 1
C.D. Espeseth

The Black Hussars
Mitchell Lüthi

Swing Trading: How to Become a Swing Trader. Complete Guide to Learning Strategies, Techniques, Tools & What You Need to Know About: Options, Stocks, Forex & Cryptocurrency
Ted Brown

Starblind: Starblind, Book 1
D. T. Dyllin

Akillia's Reign: Puatera Online Series, Book 4
Dawn Chapman

Confessions of a Shanty Irishman
Michael Corrigan

True Crime Stories Boxset: 48 Terrifying True Crime Murder Cases: List of Twelve Collection, Book 1
Ryan Becker

The Sisters
Dervla McTiernan

Body of Proof: An Audible Original
Darrell Brown,
Sophie Ellis

Understudies
Ravi Mangla

Academic Curveball: Braxton Campus Mysteries, Book 1
James J. Cudney

Dead on Instinct: A Dr. Jessica Coran, FBI, Medical Thriller: The Instinct Series, Book 15
Robert W. Walker

Captain
Thomas Block

To My Beloved Heart: The Last Journey of Edgar Allan Poe
James Marchiori

The Cabinet of Curiosities: A Novel
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

Wally Roux, Quantum Mechanic
Nick Carr

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama
Robert Louis Stevenson,
Marty Ross - adaptation

Reliquary: Pendergast, Book 2
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

Relic
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

The Life We Bury
Allen Eskens

We Are Legion (We Are Bob): Bobiverse, Book 1
Dennis E. Taylor

The Wife Between Us
Greer Hendricks,
Sarah Pekkanen

The Deep, Deep Snow
Brian Freeman

The Evil of Father: Father Earth, Book 2
Brad W. King

Backlash: The Scot Harvath Series, Book 19
Brad Thor

Leviathan Wakes
James S. A. Corey

Ender's Game Alive: The Full Cast Audioplay
Orson Scott Card

Chainworld
Matt Langley,
Paul Ebbs

The Dead Drink First
Dale Maharidge

Alien III: An Audible Original Drama
William Gibson

The Silver City: A Prequel of the Father Earth Series
Brad W. King

The Echo Killing: A Mystery
Christi Daugherty

Sherlock Holmes
Arthur Conan Doyle,
Stephen Fry - introductions

Evil Has a Name: The Untold of the Golden State Killer Investigation
Paul Holes,
Jim Clemente,
Peter McDonnell

Infernal Devices: Mortal Engines, Book 3
Philip Reeve

A Darkling Plain: Mortal Engines, Book 4
Philip Reeve

The Expectant Father: The Ultimate Guide for Dads-to-Be
Armin A. Brott,
Jennifer Ash

Yeah Baby!: The Modern Mama's Guide to Mastering Pregnancy, Having a Healthy Baby, and Bouncing Back Better Than Ever
Jillian Michaels

Situation Momedy
Jenna Von Oy

Whoa, Baby! What Just Happened?
Kelly Rowland

Predator's Gold: Mortal Engines, Book 2
Philip Reeve

Where the Crawdads Sing
Delia Owens

Sharp Objects: A Novel
Gillian Flynn

Congo
Michael Crichton

Something in the Water: A Novel
Catherine Steadman

Mortal Engines: Mortal Engines, Book 1
Philip Reeve

The Last Mrs. Parrish: A Novel
Liv Constantine

Sometimes I Lie
Alice Feeney

Silent Child: Audible's Thriller of 2017
Sarah A. Denzil

Paradox Bound: A Novel
Peter Clines

Armada
Armada: A Novel

Ernest Cline
Ready Player One

Other Actions
The Alice Network


The Alice Network: A Novel
Kate Quinn

Killman Creek
Rachel Caine

The Woman in the Window: A Novel
A. J. Finn

Murder on Black Swan Lane
Andrea Penrose

Before We Were Yours: A Novel
Lisa Wingate

The Good Samaritan
John Marrs
Children of Time
Adrian Tchaikovsky

The Midnight Line: A Jack Reacher Novel
Lee Child

Bitter Moon: The Huntress/FBI Thrillers, Book 4
Alexandra Sokoloff

Cold Moon: The Huntress/FBI Thrillers, Book 3
Alexandra Sokoloff

Blood Moon
Alexandra Sokoloff

Huntress Moon
Alexandra Sokoloff

The Good Daughter: A Novel
Karin Slaughter

Stillhouse Lake
Rachel Caine

Little Girl Lost: Detective Robyn Carter Crime Thriller Series, Book 1
Carol Wyer

The Likeness
Tana French

In the Woods: A Novel
Tana French

Never Go Back: A Jack Reacher Novel
Lee Child

My Sister's Grave: Tracy Crosswhite, Book 1
Robert Dugoni

Persuader
Lee Child

Sycamore Row
John Grisham

The Trapped Girl: Tracy Crosswhite, Book 4
Robert Dugoni

Midnight
Dean Koontz

Plum Island
Nelson DeMille

Fear Nothing
Dean Koontz

A Perfect Spy: A Novel
John le Carré

It's Superman!
Tom De Haven

The Chemist
Stephenie Meyer

Invisible Man: A Novel
Ralph Ellison

Airborn
Kenneth Oppel
submitted by bradkingbooks to FREE [link] [comments]

Giving Audiobook Gifts from my large library! Pick one and I'll send it to your Audible Library :D

Hi everyone, I have a bunch of awesome audio-books and I learned that Audible lets you gift 1 book to every Audible account. I haven't done this before so everyone will be able to get a book!

Below is my list of books, I have the Sherlock collection which is over 60 hours, The Silent Patient, Bird Box, some great Sci-fi books and much much more! Send me a message to bradkingbooks at g.mail with the book you'd like and the e.mail associated with your Audible Account that you'd like it sent to.

I'm sure I'll get a lot of requests so I'll have to batch process these, don't panic if I don't get the book to you right away, I will :)

List of Audiobooks

The Things We Cannot Say
Kelly Rimmer

The Dark Bones
Loreth Anne White

A Killer's Mind: Zoe Bentley Mystery
Mike Omer

Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man's Fundamentals for Delicious Living
Nick Offerman

Dad Is Fat
Jim Gaffigan

Sentiment Inc.: The Retro Sci-Fi Series, Book 2
Poul Anderson

Shadows of Tomorrow
Jessica Meats

Thinking Big: Think Differently, Grow Rich, Develop Better Personal Relationships, Move Up the Corporate Ladder, Sleep Better and Fight Mediocrity: Everything You Need to Become a Stable, Succesful Human: Superior Ultralearning Topics, Book One
Paxton Arbital

What to Expect When You’re Expecting
Heidi Murkoff

So, You Want to Talk About Government Contracting?: Everything You Need to Know in Order to Become a Government Contracting Master - 3 Guides in 1!
Brad W. King

Then She Was Gone: A Novel
Lisa Jewell

The Silent Patient
Alex Michaelides

Bird Box: A Novel
Josh Malerman

The Silver Horn Echoes: A Song of Roland
Michael Eging,
Steve Arnold

The Burnout Generation
Anne Helen Petersen

One Good Deed
David Baldacci

DragonMan: The 13th Sign: DragonMan Series, Book 8
Ted Lazaris


Visions: Knights of Salucia, Book 1
C.D. Espeseth

The Black Hussars
Mitchell Lüthi

Swing Trading: How to Become a Swing Trader. Complete Guide to Learning Strategies, Techniques, Tools & What You Need to Know About: Options, Stocks, Forex & Cryptocurrency
Ted Brown

Starblind: Starblind, Book 1
D. T. Dyllin

Akillia's Reign: Puatera Online Series, Book 4
Dawn Chapman

Confessions of a Shanty Irishman
Michael Corrigan

True Crime Stories Boxset: 48 Terrifying True Crime Murder Cases: List of Twelve Collection, Book 1
Ryan Becker

The Sisters
Dervla McTiernan

Body of Proof: An Audible Original
Darrell Brown,
Sophie Ellis

Understudies
Ravi Mangla

Academic Curveball: Braxton Campus Mysteries, Book 1
James J. Cudney

Dead on Instinct: A Dr. Jessica Coran, FBI, Medical Thriller: The Instinct Series, Book 15
Robert W. Walker

Captain
Thomas Block

To My Beloved Heart: The Last Journey of Edgar Allan Poe
James Marchiori

The Cabinet of Curiosities: A Novel
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

Wally Roux, Quantum Mechanic
Nick Carr

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama
Robert Louis Stevenson,
Marty Ross - adaptation

Reliquary: Pendergast, Book 2
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

Relic
Douglas Preston,
Lincoln Child

The Life We Bury
Allen Eskens

We Are Legion (We Are Bob): Bobiverse, Book 1
Dennis E. Taylor

The Wife Between Us
Greer Hendricks,
Sarah Pekkanen

The Deep, Deep Snow
Brian Freeman

The Evil of Father: Father Earth, Book 2
Brad W. King

Backlash: The Scot Harvath Series, Book 19
Brad Thor

Leviathan Wakes
James S. A. Corey

Ender's Game Alive: The Full Cast Audioplay
Orson Scott Card

Chainworld
Matt Langley,
Paul Ebbs

The Dead Drink First
Dale Maharidge

Alien III: An Audible Original Drama
William Gibson

The Silver City: A Prequel of the Father Earth Series
Brad W. King

The Echo Killing: A Mystery
Christi Daugherty

Sherlock Holmes
Arthur Conan Doyle,
Stephen Fry - introductions

Evil Has a Name: The Untold of the Golden State Killer Investigation
Paul Holes,
Jim Clemente,
Peter McDonnell

Infernal Devices: Mortal Engines, Book 3
Philip Reeve

A Darkling Plain: Mortal Engines, Book 4
Philip Reeve

The Expectant Father: The Ultimate Guide for Dads-to-Be
Armin A. Brott,
Jennifer Ash

Yeah Baby!: The Modern Mama's Guide to Mastering Pregnancy, Having a Healthy Baby, and Bouncing Back Better Than Ever
Jillian Michaels

Situation Momedy
Jenna Von Oy

Whoa, Baby! What Just Happened?
Kelly Rowland

Predator's Gold: Mortal Engines, Book 2
Philip Reeve

Where the Crawdads Sing
Delia Owens

Sharp Objects: A Novel
Gillian Flynn

Congo
Michael Crichton

Something in the Water: A Novel
Catherine Steadman

Mortal Engines: Mortal Engines, Book 1
Philip Reeve

The Last Mrs. Parrish: A Novel
Liv Constantine

Sometimes I Lie
Alice Feeney

Silent Child: Audible's Thriller of 2017
Sarah A. Denzil

Paradox Bound: A Novel
Peter Clines

Armada
Armada: A Novel

Ernest Cline
Ready Player One

Other Actions
The Alice Network


The Alice Network: A Novel
Kate Quinn

Killman Creek
Rachel Caine

The Woman in the Window: A Novel
A. J. Finn

Murder on Black Swan Lane
Andrea Penrose

Before We Were Yours: A Novel
Lisa Wingate

The Good Samaritan
John Marrs
Children of Time
Adrian Tchaikovsky

The Midnight Line: A Jack Reacher Novel
Lee Child

Bitter Moon: The Huntress/FBI Thrillers, Book 4
Alexandra Sokoloff

Cold Moon: The Huntress/FBI Thrillers, Book 3
Alexandra Sokoloff

Blood Moon
Alexandra Sokoloff

Huntress Moon
Alexandra Sokoloff

The Good Daughter: A Novel
Karin Slaughter

Stillhouse Lake
Rachel Caine

Little Girl Lost: Detective Robyn Carter Crime Thriller Series, Book 1
Carol Wyer

The Likeness
Tana French

In the Woods: A Novel
Tana French

Never Go Back: A Jack Reacher Novel
Lee Child

My Sister's Grave: Tracy Crosswhite, Book 1
Robert Dugoni

Persuader
Lee Child

Sycamore Row
John Grisham

The Trapped Girl: Tracy Crosswhite, Book 4
Robert Dugoni

Midnight
Dean Koontz

Plum Island
Nelson DeMille

Fear Nothing
Dean Koontz

A Perfect Spy: A Novel
John le Carré

It's Superman!
Tom De Haven

The Chemist
Stephenie Meyer

Invisible Man: A Novel
Ralph Ellison

Airborn
Kenneth Oppel
submitted by bradkingbooks to audiobooks [link] [comments]

how do you compose your portfolio and how do you choose what to trade today ?

hello,
i have been trading for a few years, and it works (so far ;) ) but i think that now, the main thing i need to improve is the portfolio.
I choose this when i started : gbpjpy / eurusd / audcad / nzdchf and gold. The newbie me at the time thought this would be a good uncorrelated portfolio... not quite
My strategy allows me to trade almost whatever, options, stock, index, forex... and i trade in D1 so i can look at a lot of charts and take 1 or 2 trade a mouth on each charts. BUT this is not about the strategy (if it's possible to separate the two), lets just build a thread about how to select the right chart, it will probably help more people than just me.
I have seen the correlation tables, the relationship between some pairs and commodities, ect... but honestly so far i am still confused and trade chart that doesn't look correlated without real knowledge about it.
Sorry if i bring more questions than answers ! Thanks
submitted by jopopodu97 to Daytrading [link] [comments]

MAME 0.215

MAME 0.215

A wild MAME 0.215 appears! Yes, another month has gone by, and it’s time to check out what’s new. On the arcade side, Taito’s incredibly rare 4-screen top-down racer Super Dead Heat is now playable! Joining its ranks are other rarities, such as the European release of Capcom‘s 19XX: The War Against Destiny, and a bootleg of Jaleco’s P-47 – The Freedom Fighter using a different sound system. We’ve got three newly supported Game & Watch titles: Lion, Manhole, and Spitball Sparky, as well as the crystal screen version of Super Mario Bros. Two new JAKKS Pacific TV games, Capcom 3-in-1 and Disney Princesses, have also been added.
Other improvements include several more protection microcontrollers dumped and emulated, the NCR Decision Mate V working (now including hard disk controllers), graphics fixes for the 68k-based SNK and Alpha Denshi games, and some graphical updates to the Super A'Can driver.
We’ve updated bgfx, adding preliminary Vulkan support. There are some issues we’re aware of, so if you run into issues, check our GitHub issues page to see if it’s already known, and report it if it isn’t. We’ve also improved support for building and running on Linux systems without X11.
You can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.

MAMETesters Bugs Fixed

New working machines

New working clones

Machines promoted to working

New machines marked as NOT_WORKING

New clones marked as NOT_WORKING

New working software list additions

Software list items promoted to working

New NOT_WORKING software list additions

Source Changes

submitted by cuavas to emulation [link] [comments]

22 year old friendship ruined, need your thoughts....

I'd love some perspective on a recent story that's bothering me. Any and all perspectives welcomed.
In August last year an old friend (we're 38 now and 16 when we met) had been doing a guidance ritual with his mum who is trained to be a shaman… she gave him LSD as part of the ritual- and I haven't tried it so I don't know what it's like.
Anyway, for some reason I contacted him out of the blue the next day when he was still feeling some of the effects. He told me that he loved me, probably always had and it had been a long time coming. I was really surprised, but it was lovely. On some level I'd always felt like that about him (I denied it a lot over the years) but really didn't think that he would ever say or feel something like that.
In that convo he said I'd make a great girlfriend and he'd be lucky to have me, I was really smart and lovely but intense and opinionated. Also, that ironically he thought he'd missed his one chance at happiness with me (you can understand the ironically part when you know the backstory). He said I was beautiful and he was stupid for not being completely in love with me. He said he was sure we'd known each other in past lives. I was very touched by all of this because I adore him but I took it with a pinch of salt, and tried to find out if it was just a fleeting feeling.
But he also said that his life is on a dark path, and that in this lifetime he is only meant to suffer, maybe he'll be dead by 50 and we should see each other in the next life. He said he has huge issues (lots of drink and drugs of many types), is also very intense, and I'd never be able to handle the up and down of his lifestyle.
I got the feeling that he was having those thoughts about loving me for the first time right then, so I asked him if he’d felt like that before, or just that night. And he said he’d thought it the last time we spoke when I’d interviewed him for a book a couple of years previously. But I didn’t get the impression he’d really felt like that when we were younger.
I checked a month or 2 later if he remembered what he said because I thought maybe he had just been high. He said he thought he remembered everything he had said, and said I wasn't very nice for not believing him, so I was really happy and decided to go and see him.
Fast forward a couple months to after Christmas - I hadn't been to see him yet- but we’d been messaging and sending photos. For Christmas, his mum had bought him a tarot card reading with a chocolate ritual with a shaman or a psychic lady, and he was sharing with me that he'd done it and that it said his head was really messed up. He seemed quite upset.
So me being 5% moron, my nervousness and excitedness had returned (I was always very, very nervous around him when we were young) and I made a joke he really didn't appreciate, offering to shoot him in the head if he wanted (I was trying to lighten the mood, and also we seemed to be getting a bit more gentle, intimate and less jokey in the way that we were talking to each other, which freaks me out. He's much sweeter than he used to be, and it kind of makes me freeze up a bit).
Well! Bang. It was like I stabbed him in the chest or something. It seemed to instantly remind him of all the things that annoy him about me, and after 5 months being really sweet he went cold on me. Really, really cold. From there I got very confused and kept making worse mistakes because I got nervous, and kept trying to fix it. I sent him some long, weird email which I’m sure made things worse. I also posted something on Facebook which made it look like I was chatting to other guys. All very silly. It's ridiculous. I'm an adult and am pretty confident these days. But suddenly I was really nervous again feeling like a kid and like there’s something terribly wrong with me.
I arranged to go and see him for a few days in Tenerife, and before I went it was pretty tense between us and I couldn't tell if he wanted me to go or not- I did everything I could to try and find out if he actually wanted me to go or not- but he was his usual tight-lipped self. When I got there, he was very hospitable, apologized for being off-radar and showed me round, we went out to bars and the beach...
We spent four days (before he had to go home to England) as a quasi-couple, and it was a very surreal experience. It was bizarrely intimate, sweet but tense, with someone I know very well... naked. For the first time I realised how peace-loving and gentle he is- which I never saw before. He can't stand a lot of the more boisterous things I do, which is fair, but ironically they're things I tended to do from nerves and trying to get his attention. I kind of got it after that- why he finds me so aversive sometimes, it's like we're stuck in a negative feedback loop, and he thinks I’m too harsh for his delicate constitution. Which, he might just be right about.
In between the fun, laughing, joking, drinking, sex and bonding- of which there was lots and it was really nice - he was filled with sadness and depression, grumpiness, and a funny attitude from him that seemed to shout: "yuck, it's you, you're more like a sisteannoying irritation than a woman to me." He said that it was because his life was falling apart- and he was obviously very very depressed but trying to show me a good time and doing a good job of it too, I might add. But so many things pointed to the fact that he mainly just felt annoyed by me, found me totally unsuitable, and kind of pitied me, rather than feeling any love for me, and that he finds me generally very annoying. Wall up, blinds closed, aint comin' in.
He also kept telling me about his lifestyle of drink and drugs and how everyone he knows is a junky or a crazy person. It felt like he was trying very hard to make me see reality and put me off him, or save me from him, or warn me, or see how I would react and if I would run. Or save himself from what he sees as inevitable hostility and rejection (as well as from me and how annoying I am). "Be careful what you wish for" and "curiosity killed the cat" seemed to be his repetitive catchphrases when I showed an interest in him. Apparently, his ex thinks he's a bastard, he would tell me.
I think, ideally, if he could change me (he used to talk a lot about me doing DHT to rebalance myself) he would want to be in a relationship, because we enjoy each other’s company. But it could only work if he was tougher and I was less harsh. I think he sees these things quite clearly as they are – that he’s got a delicate constitution, and I’m far too frustrated by him to be delicate enough for things to work out. I’d soon get pissed off and ditch the situation, rather than sweep things under the rug and carry on from day to day in a carefree world of consumption- I just couldn’t do that. I’m a strategic future-planner.
At one point we played some intimacy/trust game with lots of questions, and he loosened up a little... but the way he would answer questions like "Name 3 things you like about your partner" was like "well you ARE very caring" in the same way that someone might say "Well, Hitler WAS very spiritual." It's funny because in relationships I'm very soft in general, in recent years, but I do still get very harsh and frustrated when problems don’t seem solvable. But with him I just can't seem to relax and trust him enough to be soft with him at all, and he didn't give me a chance anyway. We just don’t trust each other- we’re not safe for each other.
After I went home he checked in with me a couple times, which I liked. He tried to share some things with me that interest him, about quite spiritual or unusual subjects (trees being interconnected, aliens having been involved in human development, DHT, the memory of water… stuff that as someone who studied physics I don’t normally hear about, but I’m pretty open to hearing about them)- he's very soft and very chilled- doesn’t like stress at all. But every time I tried to dig a bit deeper and engage with him to see what it was about them that interested him - he completely ignored me. Didn’t try, nothing. Me trying to talk with him about the things he shared seemed to send the walls up and just bug him. Really really frustrating. It's like I couldn't do anything right. Particularly frustrating when he said he was trying to open up my mind- but then wouldn't connect or follow through.
So, for a couple months, for the first time in 20 years I seemed to be chasing him. It's like he promised me something, judged me for being nervous and "annoying" and not perfect, and then instead of being understanding, he ran. Yikes.
Eventually I got so confused I sent him screenshots of the conversation where he'd said he loved me and he didn't even remember it! He was shocked, blamed it on the drugs and mental illness saying that he was "not a well person." He said he was beginning to get the feeling that he'd "annoyed me" now, and that he sees me as a friend, and he didn't mean to piss me off. Then he changed the subject. He finished up that conversation by saying "we're on different paths and in different places", and he needs to sort himself out and that's that.
The backstory goes like this… The first year we knew eachother he nicknamed me “TT” which meant “no tits and no teeth” (I had big gaps before I had braces). He used to do things like hit me on the butt with a stick and then I’d punch him and go nuts. He really took the piss out of me with his friends and girlfriends because I had a huge crush on him (he thought it was hilarious that I felt like I’d been struck by lightning when I first saw him). They used to put me on speakerphone and laugh. He was the only guy I ever asked out – which I did on his answer machine!! Ugh. So, yeah, really humiliated me actually and I’ve never asked anyone out since (thank goodness I’m a woman, haha).
After that I had braces and turned into a social person who had lots of parties and friends. He started being really nice to me. But I didn’t forgive him very easily, and we had a big bust up and weren't friends for a year or so. I did a pizza leaflet with his phone number on it. And I banned him from my 18th birthday party to which all our friends were going, and he was pretty upset. I felt bad once when I saw him outside one of my parties on the curb holding his head in his hands saying “why does she hate me so much?” Well, deep down I loved the guy, but he’d humiliated me, so I guess there was a thin line between love and hate. I don’t know if that would have made him feel any better, but hopefully.
From some point on, we made up and we always had great chemistry after that... we did things like hanging out and smoking some weed in his car together with other people, going out in London with our mutual friends, him giving me lots of lifts home from pubs and friends houses, me driving his car drunk and pretending I was going to crash it to wind him up (that was stupid and irresponsible).
Looking back I think he kind of liked me at that point but was scared of me, didn’t know how to make a move as I had moved on and had given him such a hard time, but at the time I really didn't have a clue whether he liked me or not, I was always just very, very feisty and energetic around him (after all the humiliation I guess) so I could never be calm.
Then we went to the same uni town, texted constantly for a year, and even then he said he thought we’d known each other in past lives. To my friends I gave him the nickname "my future husband", he asked me out in the cutest way by saying that if I had the guts and the inclination to go out with him, then we should go for a drink. I was soooo excited..
Well, we almost went out and then he dropped out of uni because of an argument with a lecturer or something. I honestly believe everyone has to follow their own path, so for me it was just sad for him that he had so much stress, and it was disappointing about the date. Our first kiss was when he came up to the uni town again and we did a pub crawl, and he seemed to want to go and sit somewhere and be sweet but I was too nervous so we just kept doing the pubcrawl and ended up spooning on a friend’s floor (just hugging and kissing).
We almost went on a date in our home area but he cancelled without suggesting an alternative, and I got annoyed so he stopped talking to me- surprisingly easily- it’s like he has a very low threshold for any kind of angst, and isn’t able to soothe himself or the other person, so just bails. Which, considering the fact that he creates a lot of angst-provoking situations means that he kind of expects to go through life without facing any consequences for his actions. Pretty frustrating for someone like me, who expects quite a lot of openness and honesty.
We eventually hooked up once and he never called me after so after waiting for a while, I reluctantly moved on and ended up with someone else for 4 years. I have no idea how he felt about this, but a couple of small things surprised me and I wondered if he had actually felt more than I gave him credit for. I mean, that love confession blew me away, I wouldn't have thought for a moment that he had been harbouring any thoughts like that about me, I thought for him it was all a big joke and meant nothing, so maybe he did feel something other than annoyance for me when we were younger.
It's hard to tell as he's been with a lot of women, is very tight-lipped and doesn’t put himself on the line, or take any risks at all. But in those days I was always so nervous around him that any signs would have just gone completely under the radar anyway.
A few years later, after lots of traveling, he popped up working in the office down the hall from me at this random summer job I took and we started emailing lots. He seemed disappointed with how life was not as exciting as he'd expected. Then he disappeared one day- he was living with his ex at the time (very lovely girl) and I was with the same guy (the 4 year one).
A few years after that we were back hanging around in the same social circle until everyone, including him, moved abroad, and eventually, so did i. It was funny, I would always be able to talk to him if I was upset about, say, moving to uni or something. It didn't happen often but a couple of times.
Most of this he probably wouldn't even remember because I think he's been with a lot a lot of girls.
He has low self-esteem, apparently. He thinks he has bad luck with women even though women adore him (he's exceptionally easy on the eyes. He’s beautiful actually)- and according to a mutual friend of ours, when he was a teenager he always worried that no decent women would want someone like him.
Recently (in the past 15 years, which isn’t so recent, lol) we didn't really hang out much but we became more normal adults. I went down quite a dry academic path and got a BSc in physics with astrophysics and an MSc in clinical research, and ended up stuck in a corporate job I hated until I quit to become a writer, whereas he had more balls than me and did what he wanted much earlier- becoming an entrepreneur trading stock, gold, Forex, imports and exports... at times making a fortune and at other times going bust and beating himself up for it, but always finding something new to try, which I think's pretty damn cool (but try convincing him of that).
It's pretty normal for entrepreneurial people to have ups and downs in their success-levels I think, but he seems to judge himself very harshly. The last couple of years he’s been making more money than I’ve ever been able to shake a stick at! I really don’t think he should feel ashamed at all (which he seems to), I think he should feel proud that he’s so dynamic. Good for him. He’s awesome. The only thing I wish is that he had heavy enough emotional armor that he could deal with more difficult situations without bailing.
Anyway. Over the years I stopped being super into him and we had a nice, pretty normal friendship -we chatted sometimes on messenger and would always have nice chemistry when we saw each other. He's been trying to arrange a visit for about 10 years or so between the various countries we've been living in (we're both expat people and he wanted to come see me in Madrid and Amsterdam when I lived there, then he wanted me to go seem him in Tenerife for a few years) and I've avoided it, as although I wanted to see him I was scared of a casual fling with him as it’s not what I wanted, and I really don’t like that kind of thing anyway (tried it once or twice thinking I could handle it and I was being all “modern” and cool and everything – because I think I’m a bit old fashioned deep down - but I got emotionally attached and then end up hurt. So now I accept myself for who I am- someone who doesn’t really like flings or casual stuff, but someone who is into monogamy. Whoops! How very boring and unfashionable, and I don’t give a shit. Rayyyy for the love. Whoop whoop.).
A couple years ago I interviewed him for a book I wrote about ADHD entrepreneurs. His lifestyle was pretty cool making a lot of money through affiliate marketing and living near the beach in hot sunny Tenerife in an apartment with a pool. But he seemed to think that he sucked for some reason (everyone else seems to think it's pretty darn cool). He said that when he grew up he was under a lot of pressure and that it seemed to have messed up his head. He said that to do well in life you need to do what you want to do, because if you listen to other people you are only going to be messed up. When he was on LSD he said that he had thought he loved me during that interview.
This year, his life as an expat abroad basically fell apart as the affiliate marketing scheme crashed and he had to move home to live with his parents, which has brought him really, really down into depression. He said he keeps being told he is going to end up working in McDonalds, and being reminded of the fact that he’s almost 40, and this seemed to be weighing on his mind. It sounds like a lot of pressure.
But anyway, for about 5 months after the conversation when he was on LSD he opened up to me, and he was really lovely to me. It was so nice. I guess it was because I was more relaxed and the main thing I wanted was to check up on him and see that he was ok. I didn’t have an agenda to see if he would be a match for me or anything like that- I was just really worried about him. So maybe he felt safe enough to relax.
I said that I always imagined that we would end up as platonic roommates when we were 50 and I would make him sandwiches and listen to all his funny antics – which he thought was cute. Actually, I really did like that idea- because it would take away the underlying obligations that a relationship brings that we couldn’t deliver for each other. And friendship is what relationships turn into anyway.
For my part, it's really disturbed my sleep for months since I came back from visiting him.
Now after trying to message in a friendly way during the coronavirus quarantine (er, I am very very bored) and being annoyed by his total lack of supportiveness, I've recently just told him that I don't want to be friends any more. Too painful. He says I have anger issues and I think he sees himself as an innocent victim.
Actually, if I'm honest, I've been pretty angry at a lot of people for a few years, so, maybe he has a point.
I guess I'm being a bit selfish. It's not really fair expecting anything from a self-confessed depressed, unwell person. He's "in his pit of despair" as he calls it for 6 months and he has zero interest in me. I'm utterly irrelevant to him. He's snippy, rude, ignores me, and then seems to offer a little bit of an olive branch in the smallest of ways.
Excuse the really long story, would be interested in any insight people have on this situation, particularly with respect to how you think he feels and why he acts the way he does. If I feel like I understand this situation then hopefully I can stop thinking about it, because for the past 10 years I've just had the odd nice thought every now and then about him- and would like that to become the status quo again.
submitted by clarejackson10 to relationship_advice [link] [comments]

So the winner of YYC's GoldHunt is a friend of a friend of Pirate Pepperboots (Chris Cromwell)

Could be entirely coincidence, but suuuuuper sketchy to me. I read the rumors around here so I decided to snoop myself. Check it out: https://imgur.com/a/1JkMuHl
We know "Cory and Stacey Forsythe" were declared the winners. Looking at the profiles, Cory is "In a Relationship" with Stacey Haines. That Stacey has an alternate profile called "Stacey Rose" as confirmed by the same photos used in both profiles. Stacey Rose is friends with Magda who is ALSO friends with Chris Cromwell (GoldHunt's social media host).
Now, of course this could just be a coincidence. But with all the rumors I see floating around here and overall sketchiness that has been going on during the hunt overall, I find that a "not even six degrees of Kevin Bacon"s worth of separation, but a mere two degrees, between a GoldHunt staff and the YYC winner highly interesting. Where there's smoke...?
EDIT UPDATE: Digging deeper, it appears that a bunch of people that work together with Chris in his other ventures (see https://www.facebook.com/groups/e3communitygroup/), are ALSO friends with Magda. The info suggests that these people are likely involved in Goldhunt. Chris' girlfriend, Carolin R. (who is also friends with Magda) likely has connections to GoldHunt as her LinkedIn profile describes herself as a "Crypto, Forex, Gold and Silver Enthusiast". In fact, Magda used to work for Chris as she worked at HustleCo (as seen on her FB profile) which Chris used to run workshops for (https://www.meetup.com/e3-community/events/245822653/). And now suddenly, Magda's old classmate and friend is the YYC GoldHunt winner?!
UPDATE 2: I recommend everyone look into some of Chris' other ventures as well https://www.facebook.com/chriscromwell.ca/posts/1549478445108055
submitted by GoShogun to GoldHunt [link] [comments]

MAME 0.215

MAME 0.215

A wild MAME 0.215 appears! Yes, another month has gone by, and it’s time to check out what’s new. On the arcade side, Taito’s incredibly rare 4-screen top-down racer Super Dead Heat is now playable! Joining its ranks are other rarities, such as the European release of Capcom‘s 19XX: The War Against Destiny, and a bootleg of Jaleco’s P-47 – The Freedom Fighter using a different sound system. We’ve got three newly supported Game & Watch titles: Lion, Manhole, and Spitball Sparky, as well as the crystal screen version of Super Mario Bros. Two new JAKKS Pacific TV games, Capcom 3-in-1 and Disney Princesses, have also been added.
Other improvements include several more protection microcontrollers dumped and emulated, the NCR Decision Mate V working (now including hard disk controllers), graphics fixes for the 68k-based SNK and Alpha Denshi games, and some graphical updates to the Super A'Can driver.
We’ve updated bgfx, adding preliminary Vulkan support. There are some issues we’re aware of, so if you run into issues, check our GitHub issues page to see if it’s already known, and report it if it isn’t. We’ve also improved support for building and running on Linux systems without X11.
You can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.

MAMETesters Bugs Fixed

New working machines

New working clones

Machines promoted to working

New machines marked as NOT_WORKING

New clones marked as NOT_WORKING

New working software list additions

Software list items promoted to working

New NOT_WORKING software list additions

Source Changes

submitted by cuavas to MAME [link] [comments]

addaff

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What Is Capitalism?

Capitalism is an economic system in which private individuals or businesses own capital goods. The production of goods and services is based on supply and demand in the general market—known as a market economy—rather than through central planning—known as a planned economy or command economy.
The purest form of capitalism is free market or laissez-faire capitalism. Here, private individuals are unrestrained. They may determine where to invest, what to produce or sell, and at which prices to exchange goods and services. The laissez-faire marketplace operates without checks or controls.
Today, most countries practice a mixed capitalist system that includes some degree of government regulation of business and ownership of select industries.
Volume 75% 2:05

Capitalism

Understanding Capitalism

Functionally speaking, capitalism is one process by which the problems of economic production and resource distribution might be resolved. Instead of planning economic decisions through centralized political methods, as with socialism or feudalism, economic planning under capitalism occurs via decentralized and voluntary decisions.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Capitalism is an economic system characterized by private ownership of the means of production, especially in the industrial sector.
  • Capitalism depends on the enforcement of private property rights, which provide incentives for investment in and productive use of productive capital.
  • Capitalism developed historically out of previous systems of feudalism and mercantilism in Europe, and dramatically expanded industrialization and the large-scale availability of mass-market consumer goods.
  • Pure capitalism can be contrasted with pure socialism (where all means of production are collective or state-owned) and mixed economies (which lie on a continuum between pure capitalism and pure socialism).
  • The real-world practice of capitalism typically involves some degree of so-called “crony capitalism” due to demands from business for favorable government intervention and governments’ incentive to intervene in the economy.

Capitalism and Private Property

Private property rights are fundamental to capitalism. Most modern concepts of private property stem from John Locke's theory of homesteading, in which human beings claim ownership through mixing their labor with unclaimed resources. Once owned, the only legitimate means of transferring property are through voluntary exchange, gifts, inheritance, or re-homesteading of abandoned property.
Private property promotes efficiency by giving the owner of resources an incentive to maximize the value of their property. So, the more valuable the resource is, the more trading power it provides the owner. In a capitalist system, the person who owns the property is entitled to any value associated with that property.
For individuals or businesses to deploy their capital goods confidently, a system must exist that protects their legal right to own or transfer private property. A capitalist society will rely on the use of contracts, fair dealing, and tort law to facilitate and enforce these private property rights.
When a property is not privately owned but shared by the public, a problem known as the tragedy of the commons can emerge. With a common pool resource, which all people can use, and none can limit access to, all individuals have an incentive to extract as much use value as they can and no incentive to conserve or reinvest in the resource. Privatizing the resource is one possible solution to this problem, along with various voluntary or involuntary collective action approaches.

Capitalism, Profits, and Losses

Profits are closely associated with the concept of private property. By definition, an individual only enters into a voluntary exchange of private property when they believe the exchange benefits them in some psychic or material way. In such trades, each party gains extra subjective value, or profit, from the transaction.
Voluntary trade is the mechanism that drives activity in a capitalist system. The owners of resources compete with one another over consumers, who in turn, compete with other consumers over goods and services. All of this activity is built into the price system, which balances supply and demand to coordinate the distribution of resources.
A capitalist earns the highest profit by using capital goods most efficiently while producing the highest-value good or service. In this system, information about what is highest-valued is transmitted through those prices at which another individual voluntarily purchases the capitalist's good or service. Profits are an indication that less valuable inputs have been transformed into more valuable outputs. By contrast, the capitalist suffers losses when capital resources are not used efficiently and instead create less valuable outputs.

Free Enterprise or Capitalism?

Capitalism and free enterprise are often seen as synonymous. In truth, they are closely related yet distinct terms with overlapping features. It is possible to have a capitalist economy without complete free enterprise, and possible to have a free market without capitalism.
Any economy is capitalist as long as private individuals control the factors of production. However, a capitalist system can still be regulated by government laws, and the profits of capitalist endeavors can still be taxed heavily.
"Free enterprise" can roughly be understood to mean economic exchanges free of coercive government influence. Although unlikely, it is possible to conceive of a system where individuals choose to hold all property rights in common. Private property rights still exist in a free enterprise system, although the private property may be voluntarily treated as communal without a government mandate.
Many Native American tribes existed with elements of these arrangements, and within a broader capitalist economic family, clubs, co-ops, and joint-stock business firms like partnerships or corporations are all examples of common property institutions.
If accumulation, ownership, and profiting from capital is the central principle of capitalism, then freedom from state coercion is the central principle of free enterprise.

Feudalism the Root of Capitalism

Capitalism grew out of European feudalism. Up until the 12th century, less than 5% of the population of Europe lived in towns. Skilled workers lived in the city but received their keep from feudal lords rather than a real wage, and most workers were serfs for landed nobles. However, by the late Middle Ages rising urbanism, with cities as centers of industry and trade, become more and more economically important.
The advent of true wages offered by the trades encouraged more people to move into towns where they could get money rather than subsistence in exchange for labor. Families’ extra sons and daughters who needed to be put to work, could find new sources of income in the trade towns. Child labor was as much a part of the town's economic development as serfdom was part of the rural life.

Mercantilism Replaces Feudalism

Mercantilism gradually replaced the feudal economic system in Western Europe and became the primary economic system of commerce during the 16th to 18th centuries. Mercantilism started as trade between towns, but it was not necessarily competitive trade. Initially, each town had vastly different products and services that were slowly homogenized by demand over time.
After the homogenization of goods, trade was carried out in broader and broader circles: town to town, county to county, province to province, and, finally, nation to nation. When too many nations were offering similar goods for trade, the trade took on a competitive edge that was sharpened by strong feelings of nationalism in a continent that was constantly embroiled in wars.
Colonialism flourished alongside mercantilism, but the nations seeding the world with settlements were not trying to increase trade. Most colonies were set up with an economic system that smacked of feudalism, with their raw goods going back to the motherland and, in the case of the British colonies in North America, being forced to repurchase the finished product with a pseudo-currency that prevented them from trading with other nations.
It was Adam Smith who noticed that mercantilism was not a force of development and change, but a regressive system that was creating trade imbalances between nations and keeping them from advancing. His ideas for a free market opened the world to capitalism.

Growth of Industrial Capitalism

Smith's ideas were well-timed, as the Industrial Revolution was starting to cause tremors that would soon shake the Western world. The (often literal) gold mine of colonialism had brought new wealth and new demand for the products of domestic industries, which drove the expansion and mechanization of production. As technology leaped ahead and factories no longer had to be built near waterways or windmills to function, industrialists began building in the cities where there were now thousands of people to supply ready labor.
Industrial tycoons were the first people to amass their wealth in their lifetimes, often outstripping both the landed nobles and many of the money lending/banking families. For the first time in history, common people could have hopes of becoming wealthy. The new money crowd built more factories that required more labor, while also producing more goods for people to purchase.
During this period, the term "capitalism"—originating from the Latin word "capitalis," which means "head of cattle"—was first used by French socialist Louis Blanc in 1850, to signify a system of exclusive ownership of industrial means of production by private individuals rather than shared ownership.
Contrary to popular belief, Karl Marx did not coin the word "capitalism," although he certainly contributed to the rise of its use.

Industrial Capitalism's Effects

Industrial capitalism tended to benefit more levels of society rather than just the aristocratic class. Wages increased, helped greatly by the formation of unions. The standard of living also increased with the glut of affordable products being mass-produced. This growth led to the formation of a middle class and began to lift more and more people from the lower classes to swell its ranks.
The economic freedoms of capitalism matured alongside democratic political freedoms, liberal individualism, and the theory of natural rights. This unified maturity is not to say, however, that all capitalist systems are politically free or encourage individual liberty. Economist Milton Friedman, an advocate of capitalism and individual liberty, wrote in Capitalism and Freedom (1962) that "capitalism is a necessary condition for political freedom. It is not a sufficient condition."
A dramatic expansion of the financial sector accompanied the rise of industrial capitalism. Banks had previously served as warehouses for valuables, clearinghouses for long-distance trade, or lenders to nobles and governments. Now they came to serve the needs of everyday commerce and the intermediation of credit for large, long-term investment projects. By the 20th century, as stock exchanges became increasingly public and investment vehicles opened up to more individuals, some economists identified a variation on the system: financial capitalism.

Capitalism and Economic Growth

By creating incentives for entrepreneurs to reallocate away resources from unprofitable channels and into areas where consumers value them more highly, capitalism has proven a highly effective vehicle for economic growth.
Before the rise of capitalism in the 18th and 19th centuries, rapid economic growth occurred primarily through conquest and extraction of resources from conquered peoples. In general, this was a localized, zero-sum process. Research suggests average global per-capita income was unchanged between the rise of agricultural societies through approximately 1750 when the roots of the first Industrial Revolution took hold.
In subsequent centuries, capitalist production processes have greatly enhanced productive capacity. More and better goods became cheaply accessible to wide populations, raising standards of living in previously unthinkable ways. As a result, most political theorists and nearly all economists argue that capitalism is the most efficient and productive system of exchange.

Capitalism vs. Socialism

In terms of political economy, capitalism is often pitted against socialism. The fundamental difference between capitalism and socialism is the ownership and control of the means of production. In a capitalist economy, property and businesses are owned and controlled by individuals. In a socialist economy, the state owns and manages the vital means of production. However, other differences also exist in the form of equity, efficiency, and employment.

Equity

The capitalist economy is unconcerned about equitable arrangements. The argument is that inequality is the driving force that encourages innovation, which then pushes economic development. The primary concern of the socialist model is the redistribution of wealth and resources from the rich to the poor, out of fairness, and to ensure equality in opportunity and equality of outcome. Equality is valued above high achievement, and the collective good is viewed above the opportunity for individuals to advance.

Efficiency

The capitalist argument is that the profit incentive drives corporations to develop innovative new products that are desired by the consumer and have demand in the marketplace. It is argued that the state ownership of the means of production leads to inefficiency because, without the motivation to earn more money, management, workers, and developers are less likely to put forth the extra effort to push new ideas or products.

Employment

In a capitalist economy, the state does not directly employ the workforce. This lack of government-run employment can lead to unemployment during economic recessions and depressions. In a socialist economy, the state is the primary employer. During times of economic hardship, the socialist state can order hiring, so there is full employment. Also, there tends to be a stronger "safety net" in socialist systems for workers who are injured or permanently disabled. Those who can no longer work have fewer options available to help them in capitalist societies.

Mixed System vs. Pure Capitalism

When the government owns some but not all of the means of production, but government interests may legally circumvent, replace, limit, or otherwise regulate private economic interests, that is said to be a mixed economy or mixed economic system. A mixed economy respects property rights, but places limits on them.
Property owners are restricted with regards to how they exchange with one another. These restrictions come in many forms, such as minimum wage laws, tariffs, quotas, windfall taxes, license restrictions, prohibited products or contracts, direct public expropriation, anti-trust legislation, legal tender laws, subsidies, and eminent domain. Governments in mixed economies also fully or partly own and operate certain industries, especially those considered public goods, often enforcing legally binding monopolies in those industries to prohibit competition by private entities.
In contrast, pure capitalism, also known as laissez-faire capitalism or anarcho-capitalism, (such as professed by Murray N. Rothbard) all industries are left up to private ownership and operation, including public goods, and no central government authority provides regulation or supervision of economic activity in general.
The standard spectrum of economic systems places laissez-faire capitalism at one extreme and a complete planned economy—such as communism—at the other. Everything in the middle could be said to be a mixed economy. The mixed economy has elements of both central planning and unplanned private business.
By this definition, nearly every country in the world has a mixed economy, but contemporary mixed economies range in their levels of government intervention. The U.S. and the U.K. have a relatively pure type of capitalism with a minimum of federal regulation in financial and labor markets—sometimes known as Anglo-Saxon capitalism—while Canada and the Nordic countries have created a balance between socialism and capitalism.
Many European nations practice welfare capitalism, a system that is concerned with the social welfare of the worker, and includes such policies as state pensions, universal healthcare, collective bargaining, and industrial safety codes.

Crony Capitalism

Crony capitalism refers to a capitalist society that is based on the close relationships between business people and the state. Instead of success being determined by a free market and the rule of law, the success of a business is dependent on the favoritism that is shown to it by the government in the form of tax breaks, government grants, and other incentives.
In practice, this is the dominant form of capitalism worldwide due to the powerful incentives both faced by governments to extract resources by taxing, regulating, and fostering rent-seeking activity, and those faced by capitalist businesses to increase profits by obtaining subsidies, limiting competition, and erecting barriers to entry. In effect, these forces represent a kind of supply and demand for government intervention in the economy, which arises from the economic system itself.
Crony capitalism is widely blamed for a range of social and economic woes. Both socialists and capitalists blame each other for the rise of crony capitalism. Socialists believe that crony capitalism is the inevitable result of pure capitalism. On the other hand, capitalists believe that crony capitalism arises from the need of socialist governments to control the economy.
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submitted by MattPetroski to ItalicoIntegralism [link] [comments]

Gold vs The Stock Market - Inverse Relationship Forex trading - gold and the US dollar explained How Gold Affects AUD/USD and USD/CHF 🔗 - YouTube Forex Trading: When To Buy and When To Sell - YouTube GOLD - Advanced Correlation Trading with USD and Gold! Market Movers: Tracking the Gold and USD Relationship Inverse correlation on Gold and USD/JPY, GBP/USD the only chart showing clear direction

We first checked the relationship between year-end gold prices in the period of 1980-2009, and annual CPI inflation figures in the U.S by introducing a lag of seven years at a confidence interval of 95%. As you can see in the above graph, there is barely a perceptible relationship between year-on-year CPI and gold prices. Correlation never rises above 0.2 which is well below the red lines ... Individuals who are interested in investing in gold should consider the connexion between the gold price and the forex market. The US dollar is considered the reserve currency of the world, and there is an inverse relationship between the dollar and the gold. If the dollar weakens, gold demand grow and vice-versa as supply. Compared to its trading against other currencies, the dollar is seen ... Understanding the way today’s central banks use Gold in relation to their currency helps traders to understand the relationship between Gold and the Forex market. Gold as a Currency. The ending of the Gold Standard did not put an end to Gold’s value. On the contrary, it allowed Gold to become a global “currency”, recognized by traders, individuals, and even governments as holding value ... Gold market and forex market are concerned by the investors, because they have a relatively perfect, just, fair environment and more investment opportunities. There is a very close relationship between the two markets. However, the gold market and forex market are unpredictable with benefits and risks. Thus, if you understand their mutual influence and role, may be able to find more investment ... Understanding the way today’s central banks use Gold in relation to their currency helps traders to understand the relationship between Gold and the Forex market. Gold as a Currency. The ending of the Gold Standard did not put an end to Gold’s value. On the contrary, it allowed Gold to become a global “currency”, recognized by traders, individuals, and even governments as holding value ... The relationship about USD and Gold is explained in Jimmi’s answer I would like to answer about other currencies which affect the gold prices: The currencies having positive co-relation with gold are commodity currencies like Australian dollar, Ca... But when there is a such a strong overlap between gold and forex markets, well, I just can’t resist! Recently, gold prices have collapsed at virtually the same rate as the Euro, with the result being a near-record high short-term correlation between EUR/USD and gold prices. This has caused no shortage of confusion among gold-watchers, which are accustomed to seeing the strongest (inverse ... How the Presidential Election Affects the US Economy and Gold FOREX.com August 5, ... When it comes to the relationship between the economy and US presidential elections, causality flows both ways. Stated differently, the strength of the economy has a major impact on which party is elected (in the words of Bill Clinton’s successful ’92 campaign against George H. W. Bush, “It’s the ... The chart below shows the relationship between gold prices and the yield on TIPS, a proxy for real interest rates in the United States. The inverse correlation is obvious, but it looks like gold’s rally accelerated as real yields dropped below 1% in early 2009. Not surprisingly, a longer-term look at the relationship would reveal that gold ... The relationship between gold, oil and major currencies may help trades and investors to trade with different strategies or hedge their portfolio. Slightly delayed correlations of these movements ...

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Gold vs The Stock Market - Inverse Relationship

Everyone would like to trade Forex if they could get consistent profit. But the problem is, when you are working to learn to trade Forex, when to buy and whe... Richard Perry, Market Analyst for Hantec Markets, joined Zak Mir and Bill Hubard on the Tip TV Finance Show to discuss the relationship between the FTSE and Oil, Gold and USD/JPY, as well as to ... Correlation between the Gold Price and AUD/USD and USD/CHF http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/academy/gold-spread-betting.html PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE THI... What is the relationship between Gold Prices and the US ... Forex trading - gold and the US dollar explained - Duration: 5:34. Anna Coulling 5,541 views. 5:34. The Ultimate Candlestick Patterns ... Take a deeper dive into the inverse relationship between gold and the stock market. Understand how gold has outperformed the market and how it's no where near it's all-time high like the stock ... In this video Anna explained the relationship between the US dollar and gold. What is the relationship between Gold Prices and the US Dollar - Duration: 8:52. futexconsultants 39,447 views. 8:52 . How to Use Fibonacci Retracements in Tradingview - Duration: 16:58. TRADEPRO ...

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